Periodontal Disease and the Association with Systemic Diseases

periodontal disease and the association with systemic diseases

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is a serious infection of the gums and supporting tissues that hold teeth in place. It is caused by the buildup of plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that forms on teeth. If plaque is not removed, it can harden into tartar, which can irritate the gums and cause them to bleed. If periodontal disease is left untreated, it can lead to tooth loss.

‍In addition to tooth loss, periodontal disease has been linked to a number of other health problems, including:

  • Diabetes: People with diabetes are more likely to develop periodontal disease than people without diabetes. This is because diabetes can weaken the immune system, making it more difficult to fight off infection.
  • Heart disease: People with periodontal disease are more likely to develop heart disease than people without periodontal disease. This is because the bacteria that cause periodontal disease can enter the bloodstream and travel to the heart, where they can cause inflammation and damage.
  • Stroke: People with periodontal disease are more likely to have a stroke than people without periodontal disease. This is because the bacteria that cause periodontal disease can also enter the bloodstream and travel to the brain, where they can cause inflammation and damage.
  • Alzheimer’s disease: People with periodontal disease are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than people without periodontal disease. This is because the bacteria that cause periodontal disease can release toxins that can damage the brain.

The exact mechanism by which periodontal disease contributes to these health problems is not fully understood. However, it is thought that the bacteria that cause periodontal disease can enter the bloodstream and travel to other parts of the body, where they can cause inflammation and damage.

If you have periodontal disease, it is important to see a dentist for treatment. Treatment for periodontal disease usually involves scaling and root planing, which are procedures that remove plaque, tartar, and bacteria from the teeth and gums. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove more advanced cases of periodontal disease.‍

Treatment for periodontal disease can help to prevent tooth loss and reduce the risk of developing other health problems. It is important to see a dentist for regular checkups and cleanings to help prevent periodontal disease from developing in the first place.

Here are some tips for preventing periodontal disease:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time.
  • Floss your teeth once a day.
  • See your dentist for regular checkups and cleanings.
  • Eat a healthy diet.
  • Avoid smoking.

‍By following these tips, you can help to keep your teeth and gums healthy and reduce your risk of developing periodontal disease.